Modern historians about Macedonia – D. G. Hogarth

 

“The ancient East” By D.G Hogarth

 

Page 80 

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It [Macedonia] was inhabited by sturdy gentry and peasantry and by agile highlanders, all composed of the same racial elements as the Greeks,with perhaps a preponderant infusion of northern blood which had come south long ago with emigrants from the Danubian lands
The social development of the Macedonians – to give various peoples one generic name – had, for certain reasons, not been nearly so rapid as that of their southern cousins. They had never come in contact with the higher Aegean civilization, nor had they mixed their blood with that of cultivated predecessors

Page 81

 

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A year after Chaeronea Philip was named by the congress of Corinth Captain-General of all Greeks to wreak the secular vengeance of Hellas on Persia

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While Philip was in Thebes as a young man, old Agesilaus, who first of Greeks had conceived the idea of invading the inland East, was still seeking a way to realize his oft-frustrated project.

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The idea had certainly been long in the air that any military power which might dominate Hellas would be bound primarily by self-interest and secondarily by racial duty to turn its arms against Asia

page 88

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Looked as a whole, and not only from a Seleucid point of view, the ancient East, during the century following Seleucus’death (forty-three years after Alexander’s) was dominated politically by Hellenes over fuly nine-tenths of its area.


Page 88

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As for Seleucus and his successors, thought the latter, from Antiochus Soter onward, had a strain of Iranian blood, they held and proved themselves essentially Hellenic.

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Ptolemy Lagus and all the Lagidae remained Macedonian Greeks to a man and a woman and to the bitter end, with the greatest Hellenic city in the world for their seat

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As for the remaining tenth part of the East, almost the whole of it was ruled by princes who claimed the title “Philhellene” and justified it not only by political friendlisness to the Seleucidae and the Western Greeks, bt also by encouraging Greek settlers and Greek manners.

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Tradition held the other element to be Hellenic, and no one in the fourth century seriously questioned its belief.

“Philip and Alexander of Macedon” by David G. Hogarth, page 5

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The king [of macedon] was chief in the first instance of a race of plain-dwellers, who held themselves to be, like him, of Hellenic stock

“Philip and Alexander of Macedon” by David G. Hogarth, page 8

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From Alexander I, who rode to the Athenian pickets the night before Plataea and proclaimed himself to the generals their friend and a Greek, down to Amyntas, father of Philip, who joined forces with Lacedaemon in 382, the kings of Macedon bid for greek support by being more Hellenic than the Hellenes.

“Philip and Alexander of Macedon” by David G. Hogarth, page 9-10

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Archelaus patronized Athenian poets and Athenian drama and commisioned Euripides to dramatize the deeds of his Argive ancestor.

“Philip and Alexander of Macedon” by David G. Hogarth, page 10

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“Macedonia” therefore, throughout historical times until the accession of Philip the Second, presents the spectacle of a nation that was no nation, but a group of discordant units, without community of race, religion, speech or sentiment, resultant from half-accomplished conquest and weak as the several sticks of the faggot in the fable.

“Philip and Alexander of Macedon” by David G. Hogarth, page 10

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