Modern Historians about Macedonia – Graham Shipley

 

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They continued to trouble Graeco-Macedonian rulers, but were probably not inherently aggressive, rather in search of a homeland. They were available to be recruited as mercenaries

The Greek World After Alexander, 323-30 Bc By Graham Shipley, page 53

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Graeco-Macedonian patronage is proved by finds of early Ptolemaic statues at the sanctuary.

The Greek World After Alexander, 323-30 Bc By Graham Shipley, page 166

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Already in the reign of Philadelphos there are signs of tensions between the Graeco-Macedonian ruling class and the native Egyptians, and as time goes by there is more and more evidence of the difficulties experienced by the state officials in running the economy.

The Greek World After Alexander, 323-30 Bc By Graham Shipley, page 230

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Among its peculiarities were that the Graeco-Macedonian rulers were, in effect, exiles from their ethnic homeland, and that they were both the creators and heirs of empire.

The Greek World After Alexander, 323-30 Bc By Graham Shipley, page 295

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From another point of view, the ‘core’ of the empire is defined vertically )in terms of social class) rather than horizontally (in terms of geographical regions) and consists of the Graeco-Macedonian ruling elite

The Greek World After Alexander, 323-30 Bc By Graham Shipley, page 296

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during the third century the old Elamite and Persian capital city of Sousa received Graeco-Macedonian colonists and was refounded as Seleukeia-on-Eulaios. Some poleis were created out of nothing (or from a non-Greek site_ and given Graeco-Macedonian citizens; this happened at Apameia-on-Orontes, Seleukeia-in-Pieria, Doura-Europos and others.

The Greek World After Alexander, 323-30 Bc By Graham Shipley, page 303

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The Seleukids fostered their Graeco-Macedonian population as a bulwark against Iranian unrest

The Greek World After Alexander, 323-30 Bc By Graham Shipley, page 323

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despite ancient and modern controversies it seems clear that the Macedonians as a whole were Greek-speakers. While the elite naturally communicated with other elites in standard, probably Attic, the ordinary Macedonians appear to have spoken a dialect of Greek, albeit with load-words from Illyrian and thracian which gave ammunition to their denigrators.

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if proof needed of the sophistication of Macedonia at this time, one may bring forward the fragments of the earliest surviving Greek literary papyrus, a carbonized book-roll found in a tomb-group of c. 340-320 at Derveni near Thessaloniki. It preserves parts of a philosophical text on Presocratic and Orphic cosmology composed around 400, and surely had a religious significance for the man in whose funeral pyre it was placed. The Derveni roll provides evidence for a high level of culture among the aristocracy.

The Greek World After Alexander, 323-30 Bc By Graham Shipley, Page 111

Lysimachos – Graham Shipley

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