F. Pouqueville – Travels in Epirus, Albania, Macedonia, and Thessaly, 1820

 
Quote:
It was my intention to make Castoria my central position, from which to make radial excursions to different points of the environs. All those it was not, however, in my power to accomplish, for various reasons, one of which was, that the surrounding inhabitants in general understood only their own tongue, that of the modern Bulgarians

“Travels in Epirus, Albania, Macedonia, and Thessaly”, F. Pouqueville (1820)

Quote:
My first expedition was directed northwards for Monastir, or Bitolia, the seat of the general government of Macedonia. Travelling by Visani and Papso-Derveni, over the spurs of Mount Sarakina, I arrived at a ford over a river running, like all the small streams on my route, to the eastward. This river the Bulgarian inhabitants called the Vardar of the Sarigul (the yellow lake,) to distinguish it from the other Vardar, the Axius of antiquity; and I concluded it to be the Erigon

“Travels in Epirus, Albania, Macedonia, and Thessaly”, F. Pouqueville (1820)

Quote:
Pushing forward beyond the Erigon for an hour, in compliance with the desire of my guides, who expected every step to be beset by robbers, we came to Machala, a large Bulgarian village, on a river still running eastward.

“Travels in Epirus, Albania, Macedonia, and Thessaly”, F. Pouqueville (1820)

Quote:
Consulting with my guide, we turned northward up the course of the Devol to Bobsouri, a Bulgarian village, where we passed the night.

“Travels in Epirus, Albania, Macedonia, and Thessaly”, F. Pouqueville (1820)

Quote:
A league north-north-west from Gheortcha, after crossing the Devol on a stone bridge, if you turn north, you enter a derven or narrow gorge of the mountain, watered by a small stream. Following it for a league and-a-half below the village of Panta-Vinia, are seen the remains of an acropolis, probably the site of Sation; and nearly opposite, a league to the westward, is the village Mocrena. To the northward, and below these villages, inhabited by Bulgarians, commences an open space of ground, which expands for a distance of four miles on to the lake of Ochrida or Lychnidus

“Travels in Epirus, Albania, Macedonia, and Thessaly”, F. Pouqueville (1820)

Quote:
At the discharge of the lake is situated Strunga, (Stronges in Procopius,) divided by the Drin, as Geneva at the discharge of its lake is divided by the Rhone, the two parts being connected by a wooden bridge, where the river is the narrowest. The inhabitants of the town, where a much frequented fair is held annually on the 8th September, are 3,000, one-fifth of them mussulmans. The course of the Drin northwards is the limit between the Bulgarian language on the east, and the Albanian on the west. From the West end of Strunga proceed two ronds, the one northwards to the Dibras, Scutari, and Dalmatia; the other southwards up the west bank of the lake, to the pass over the hills info the valley of the Devol, or Genusus, and to Elbassan and Durazzo

“Travels in Epirus, Albania, Macedonia, and Thessaly”, F. Pouqueville (1820)

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  1. “Handbook for travellers in Greece:describing the Ionian islands,the kingdom of Greece,the islands of the Aegean Sea with Albania,Thessaly and Macedonia” – 1854
  2. Modern Writers about the Bulgarian origin of FYROM’s slavs Part II
  3. Stolen Children – Epirus, Thessaly, Thrace and Macedonia Greece – passed off as Refugee Aegean Slavs
  4. Modern writers about Macedonia – 1897 The Battlefields of Thessaly, With Personal Experiences in Turkey and Greece
  5. Encyclopaedia Britannica 1824 – The People of Greece

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