Maps depicting Macedonia as part of Greece through Ages

 

1. Map of 1581

Macedonia and Greece in 1581

The Belgian geographer Abraham Ortelius was appointed Geographer to the king of Spain in 1580. At the time the Low Countries were under Spanish control. This map of Greece was printed in 1581. It shows Macedonia, of course, as a part of Greece. It also shows that Greece existed then at least in the minds of geographers, even as it was subjugated to the Ottoman empire. The word Macedonia (MA – CE – DONIA) is written in three lines over the area of Mt Olympus). The map is clearly labelled as a map of “Graeciae Universae”, the “whole of Greece”.

It also shows Thessaloniki as “Salonichi”, the Gulf of Thessalonica as Golfo de Salonichi and modern FYROM as TOPLIZA.

2. Map between 1600-1630

Mercator Hondius map of Greece showing Macedonia 1600-1630

Jodocus Hondius was a Dutch mapmaker and engraver from Amsterdam. This is a map of his published sometime between 1600-1630 and based on the Gerard Mercator Atlas, an earlier standard, contemporary to the Ortelius maps. The maps became known as the Mercator-Hondius maps. The map is clearly labelled GRAECIA. It shows Macedonia as a part of Greece, at the time subjugated to the Ottoman empire. The word Macedonia in four lines (MA-CE-DO-NIA) is written over the area of Pieria and Mt Olympus. It also shows Thessalonica (and not the wishful thinking of FYROM nationalists) and its location.

3. Map of 1645

 

Map of Greece, showing Macedonia, from 1645

Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638) founded one of history’s greatest cartographic publishing firms in 1599. Using skills learned from the celebrated Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe, Blaeu set up a shop in Amsterdam as a globe and scientific instrument maker. He soon expanded the business to include map, chart and book publishing.

This map, published by his company after his death, shows Greece at the time subjugated to the Ottoman empire, as indicated also by the Turks in the bottom left hand corner, around the label. The word Macedonia is written in three lines (MACE-DO-NIA) over the western part of modern Macedonia (in Greece). The words Castoria and Thessalonica are also just visible, as well as G. de Thessalonica, the Gulf of Thessalonica. The Slavonic words Kostur and Solun are absent from the European maps. These maps also ridicule the claim that Greece did not exist until 1830. Unless one speaks of a constitutional and free state with that specific name, which is a laughable claim because no country in that sense existed before the 19th Century with the possible exceptions of France and the United States of America.

4. Map of 1707

Map of Greece 1707

French map of Greece by Guillaune de L’Isle published originally for the Royal Academy of Science in Paris. This copy is from 1707, published by Covens et Mortier in Amsterdam. Macedonia is of course a part of Greece.

Detail of the map above showing Macedonia


The names of several cities are visible: Castoria, Veria, Seres, Ceres, Cavalla Edessa and Salonique (French version of Thessalonica), all the original Greek names – not Slavic ones.

5. Map of 1745

Map of Greece 1745

Carte de la Grece. French map by Buache circa 1745 based on a map by Guillaume de L’Isle (1675-1726) published in 1707 for the Royal Academy of Science in Paris . Once more Macedonia is a part of Greece.

6. Map of 1742

Graeciae pars Sepentrionalis 1742
French map by Guillaume de L’Isle published by Covens et Mortier in 1974. Macedonia is of course a part of Greece.

7. Ancient Greece 1823


American map of ancient Greece by Fielding Lucas Jr published in Baltimore. Macedonia is of course a part of Greece.

 

 

 

8 Time Atlas of Greece 1922

 Times Atlas of Greece 1922

Here is the Times Atlas for “Greece and the Aegean” from 1922, Published in the UK by John Bartholomew and Son. It has the word “Macedonia” over the Greek administrative district that bears the same name today. Note, the name Macedonia is not printed elsewhere in Serbia, Bulgaria, etc. The map also has the Greek names for cities such as Kastoria, Florina and “Salonika”. The Skopians claim that the names were changed from the slavonic Kostur, Lerin and Solun to the modern Greek names in 1926. This map is clear proof against their propaganda.

Detail of Macedonia

 

National Geographic map of Europe and the Mediterannean from 1915

National Geographic map of Europe and the Mediterannean from 1938

National Geographic map of Europe and the Mediterannean from 1949

Taken by http://journaloforiginalthinking.com/pb/wp_8b12f8b2/wp_8b12f8b2.html

Related posts:

Want more of this? See these Posts:

  1. Rare maps of 17th century showing Macedonia as part of Greece
  2. National Geographic maps of the Balkans states 1915 – 2006. FYROM: HOW A LIE BECOME TRUE
  3. The Greek Character of Macedonia through the Ages
  4. Skopjan propaganda “The use of the term Macedonia was forbidden in Greece until 1988″
  5. Antiquities seized in Macedonia (Northern Greece)
Comments
Cassy says:

Its because as a FYROMian “You” can hardly see anything further than your nose. You are funny creatures.

Nikola says:

i don`t understand why “I” can`t see diference betwen colours (yellow, green, red???). Your propaganda is funny.