World Museums and FYROM’s Propaganda

 

articles World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

Nationalists from the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (F.Y.R.O.M) and her diaspora constantly allege that only Greek historians and institutions subscribe to the notion that the ancient Macedonians, including the Hellenistic successors of Alexander, belonged to the sphere of the ancient Greek world. The nationalists from F.Y.R.O.M claim that the notion that the ancient Macedonians were a Greek tribe is an assertion largely motivated by propaganda efforts of the Greek state. According to nationalists from F.Y.R.O.M and her diaspora the ancient Macedonians were a proto-Slavic tribe who spoke a proto-Slavic language and are the ancestors of the Slavic population of F.Y.R.O.M. No credible and objective historian in the world supports this far fetched claim.

A quick survey of international museums, and their descriptions of ancient Macedonia and ancient Macedonian artificats, shows that many of the most reputable and respected international institutions regard the ancient Macedonians as an ancient Greek tribe.

I leave it to the reader to decide who to believe: a group of radical nationalists from F.Y.R.O.M and her diaspora who claim that Alexander the Great was a proto-Slavic speaker (even though there is not one shred of evidence to support this) who belonged to a tribe that are alleged ancestors of the Slavs of F.Y.R.O.M (a population that was almost universally regarded as Bulgarian up to 120 years ago) or the most reputable museums in the world.

[Credit goes to Georox for compiling this information]

1. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York.

metart0 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gkru/hd_gkru.htm#mace

metart1 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/tacg/hd_tacg.htm

metart2 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/alex/ho_52.127.4.htm

metart3 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/angk/hd_angk.htm

metart4 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/haht/ho_2002.66.htm

metart5 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

2. The British Museum. London.

bm0 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/world_cultures/europe/ancient_greece.aspx

bm1 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/gr/m/portrait_alexander_the_great.aspx

bm2 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/gr/d/dedication_by_alexander.aspx

bm3 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/gr/b/bronze_mask_of_dionysos.aspx

bm4 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

3. The Louvre. Paris.

Louvre0 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

Louvre1 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

louvre2 1 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

Louvre3 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

louvre4 1 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

4. The Getty. Los Angeles.

getty0 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=8128

getty1 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=8239

getty2 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=35555

getty3 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=109801

getty4 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=35552

getty5 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=248738

getty6 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

5. The Hermitage. St. Petersburg Russia

hermitage0 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://hermitagemuseum.org/html_En/03/hm3_7_1_1b.html

hermitage1 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

6. The Fitzwilliam Museum. Cambridge

fitz0 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www-cm.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/gallery/east-west/

fitz1 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

7. The Philadelphia Museum of Art.

phila0 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

http://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/40363.html?mulR=4756

phila1 World Museums and FYROMs Propaganda

By Chris Philipou

Source: http://maktruth.blogspot.com/2008/12/world-museums.html

Related posts:

Want more of this? See these Posts:

  1. World History Atlas – Alexander’s Empire
  2. Macedonia News : Nimetz in the Archaeological Museums of Pella and Thessaloniki
  3. World Encyclopaedias about Macedonia – Oxford Dictionary of Classical World
  4. Modern writers about the Bulgarian origin of FYROMs Slavs – Francis Seymour Stevenson
  5. Ridiculous Skopjan propaganda regarding the so-called ‘Macedonian church’
Comments
D-Mak says:

Troll,

Your obvious inability to comprehend that the argument i addressed was “Wikipedia is a valid source” rather than “Souliotes were or were not Greeks” speaks volume about your low IQ.

Furthermore the new childish argument you attempt to promote (“some of them are reasonable and educated greeks”) speaks volume about your entire lack of having a conversation without wasting other people’s time with Primary school claims!!

So according to your childish notion someone who doesnt happen to agree with your own perspective are:
(a) unreasonable and
(b) uneducated

I enjoy however everytime i witness blind Albanian Nationalists like you promoting ie NGL Hammond, “Epirus” only when it suits their Nationalistic Agenda. (Turning a blind eye when the same “educated and reasonable” Author makes it more than obvious that ancient Epirotes were Greek etc.

For the other side’s argument that your exact “valid” source neglected to mention there is a list in this link.

http://www.macedoniaontheweb.com/forum/epirus-forum/343-souliotes-17.html

Go there and waste these peoples’ time with your crap. Not ours!!

Adrian Profiti says:

x the intruder D-Mac

Souliotes (ALBANIAN: SULIOTET, Greek: Σουλιώτες, also spelled Souliots or Suliots) were a warlike ethnically ALBANIAN community, that became integrated into the Greek nation. They established an autonomous association of villages resisting Ottoman rule in 18th and 19th-century in Souli, Epirus. They belonged to the Greek Orthodox Church and spoke the CHAM dialect of ALBANIAN.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

Souliotes were named after the village of Souli, a mountain settlement in Thesprotia, Greece, which derives from the ALBANIAN word SULI, meaning “mountain summit”.[16]

References
^ Richard Clogg, Minorities in Greece: Aspects of a Plural Society, 2002 ISBN 1850657068, 9781850657064 “The Souliotes were a warlike ALBANIAN Christian community, which resisted Ali Pasha in Epirus in the years immediately preceding the outbreak the Greek War of Independence”
^ Great Britain Naval Intelligence Division, Henry Clifford Darby, Greece, University Press, 1944. “…who belongs to the CHAM branch of south ALBANIAN TOSKS (see volume I, pp.363-5).In the mid-eighteenth century these people (the Souliotes)were a semi-autonomous community…”
^ a b Miranda Vickers, The Albanians: A Modern History, I.B.Tauris, 1999, ISBN 1860645410, 9781860645419 “The Suliots, then numbering around 12,000, were Christian ALBANIANS inhabiting a small independent community somewhat akin to tat of the Catholic Mirdite trive to the north
^ a b c d Nicholas Charles Pappas, Greeks in Russian Military Service in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries, Institute for Balkan Studies, 1991
^ Katherine Elizabeth Fleming, The Muslim Bonaparte: Diplomacy and Orientalism in Ali Pasha’s Greece, Princeton University Press, 1999, ISBN 0691001944, ISBN 9780691001944 “The history of the orthodox ALBANIAN peoples of the mountain stronghold of Souli provides an example of such an overlap”
^ Gerolymatos, p. 141. “The Suliot dance of death is an integral image of the Greek revolution and it has been seared into the consciousness of Greek schoolchildren for generations. Many youngsters pay homage to the memory of these Orthodox ALBANIANS each year by recreating the event in their elementary school pageants.”
^ Balázs Trencsényi, Michal Kopecek. Discourses of Collective Identity in Central and Southeast Europe (1770-1945): The Formation of National Movements, Published by Central European University Press, 2006, ISBN 963732660X, 9789637326608 p. 173 “The Souliotes were ALBANIAN by origin and Orthodox by faith”
^ Giannēs Koliopoulos, John S. Koliopoulos, Thanos Veremēs. Greece: The Modern Sequel : from 1831 to the Present Edition: 2 Published by C. Hurst & Co. Publishers, 2004 ISBN 185065462X, 9781850654629 p. 184 describes Souliotes as “Orthodox and partly hellenized Albanian tribes”.
^ Eric Hobsbawm, Nations and Nationalism Since 1780: Programme, Myth, Reality Edition: 2, Published by Cambridge University Press, 1992 ISBN 0521439612, 9780521439619 p. 65
^ NGL Hammond, Epirus: the Geography, the Ancient Remains, the History and Topography of Epirus and Adjacent Areas, Published by Clarendon P., 1967, p. 31 “The Laps held the area from Valona to Delvine and inland to Tepelene; the tsams from Delvine to Souli and inland to Ioannina and Pogoniani”
^ Helen Angelomatis-Tsougarakis, The Eve of the Greek Revival: British Travellers’ Perceptions of Early Nineteenth-century Greece, Published by Taylor & Francis, 1990, ISBN 0415034825, 9780415034821
^ William Miller, The Ottoman Empire and Its Successors, 1801-1927, Published by Routledge, 1966, ISBN 0714619744, 9780714619743
^ Arnakis, George C. “The Role of Religion in the Development of Balkan Nationalism”, pp. 118-119, 141 (Jelavich, Barbara and Jelavich, Charles. The Balkans in Transition: Essays on the Development of Balkan Life and Politics since the Eighteenth Century. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1963).
^ Batalden, Stephen K. Catherine II’s Greek prelate: Eugenios Voulgaris in Russia, 1771-1806. East European Monographs, 1982, ISBN 0880330066, p. 142.
^ Jochalas, T. To hellêno-albanikon lexikon tu Marku Mpotzarê. Filologikê ekdosis ek tu autografu hypo Titu P. Giochala (Pragmateiai tês Akadêmias Athênôn, 46, Athens, 1980).
^ Babiniotis, G. Λεξικό της Νέας Ελληνικής Γλώσσας. Athens, 1998.

D-Mak, the above mentionned authors (some of them are reasonable and educated greeks) don’t agree with you.
See? Still think that Suliots are greek? (lol)
ciao bello, svegliati, non e mai tardi per ritornare a scuola, fin che si vive s’impara, asino!

D-Mak says:

Adrian Profiti,

You know as well as i do that your arguments are plainly CHILDISH. But let us not argue too much about facts too evident to be discussed.

To drop by and use as “source” a website where even YOU could easily edit and write whatever you wish, makes your point of view even more childish. So if i edited the specific wikipedia article and wrote what I wanted would that made it a Universal Truth???

Having said that i assure you that i am not holding any quams against certain ethnicities but i do hold them when i witness such a Poor reasoning and blatant logic loops like yours.

Dear Dimitrios,

You know as well as I do that the Souliotes were not a Greek comunity. But let us not argue about facts too evident
to be discussed. You better check the link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markos_Botsari, just to mention a source of info. The very first paragraph says literally:
Markos Botsaris (Greek: Μάρκος Μπότσαρης, Albanian: Marko Boçari, c.1788 -- August 21, 1823), was a leader of the Souliotes, an autonomous Orthodox ALBANIAN community in Ottoman-held Epirus, who played an important role in the War of Greek Independence. Period

Having said that, I assure you that I am very fond of Greece, its culture and people.
A la prochaine!!!

Dimitrios says:

Adrian

You mean of course, “Markos Botsaris was a leader of the Souliotes,
who were a GREEK community in Epirus …”.

Markos Botsaris (Greek: Μάρκος Μπότσαρης, Albanian: Marko Boçari, c.1788 -- August 21, 1823), was a leader of the Souliotes, an autonomous Orthodox Albanian community in Ottoman-held Epirus, who played an important role in the War of Greek Independence.