Utrinski vesnik: Unnecessary strained relations

 
Utrinski vesnik: Unnecessary strained relations
 
8 August 2009 | 12:35 | FOCUS News Agency
 
Skopje. The newest foreign-political problem of ” Macedonia” appeared unexpectedly but with great strength and power, Philip Petrovski commented in an article published in Utrinski vesnik.
The Bulgarian Spaska Mirtova’s case was reason Bulgaria to publish official message in which it was noted the country assesses “Macedonia’s” readiness to access the EU.
“As it was expected, all newspapers have attacked those statements with hardest comments,” Petrovski said. He added Bulgaria’s behavior was compared to this of Greece.
“Some people even saw international problem, which has been planned and plotted against us for a long time,” the author pointed.
The author said “Macedonia” has rejected the accusations and thus announcing case closed and that it has done its job. However, Petrovski has not been sure and proposes analyses of different aspects of the situation.
It is normal to expect relations between “Macedonia” and Bulgaria would become better after parliamentary elections in Bulgaria and the victory of the right wing. Unfortunately, there is mistrust between the two countries that has been implanted for long time. It could be supported or left. The two countries must make the choice, Perovski said.
Mirtova’s case could be defined as pragmatic as a message Bulgaria’s policy towards “Macedonia” could change and become more aggressive.
This country as well as Greece is NATO and EU member state and unlike us has analyses on Greece’s attitude towards us,” the author writes and pointed “the real policy shows the strong one do what they can and the weaker-what they have to.”

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