Philip II of Macedon (Wikipedia)

 

Philip II of Macedon

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Philip II
Basileus of Macedon
250px Filip II Macedonia Philip II of Macedon (Wikipedia)
Bust of Philip II of Macedon
Reign 359 BC – 336 BC
Greek Φίλιππος
Born 382 BC
Birthplace Pella, Macedon
Died October, 336 BC (aged 46)
Place of death Aigai, Macedon
Buried Aigai, Macedon
Predecessor Amyntas IV
Successor Alexander the Great
Wives Audata
Phila
Nicesipolis
Philinna
Olympias
Meda of Odessa
Cleopatra Eurydice
Offspring Cynane
Philip III
Alexander the Great
Cleopatra
Thessalonica
Royal House Argead dynasty
Father Amyntas III
Mother Eurydice II

Philip II of Macedon, (Greek: Φίλιππος Β’ ο Μακεδών — φίλος = friend + ίππος = horse[1] — transliterated 11px Loudspeaker.svg Philip II of Macedon (Wikipedia)[Philippos] (help·info) 382 – 336 BC, was an ancient Greek[2][3] king (basileus) of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination in 336. He was the father of Alexander the Great and Philip III.

Contents

1 Life 2 Assassination 3 Marriages 4 Archaeological findings 5 References 6 External links

 

 

 Life

Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of the king Amyntas III and Eurydice II. In his youth, (c. 368–365 BC) Philip was held as a hostage in Thebes, which was the leading city of Greece during the Theban hegemony. While a captive there, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, became eromenos of Pelopidas,[4][5] and lived with Pammenes, who was an enthusiastic advocate of the Sacred Band of Thebes. In 364 BC, Philip returned to Macedon. The deaths of Philip’s elder brothers, King Alexander II and Perdiccas III, allowed him to take the throne in 359 BC. Originally appointed regent for his infant nephew Amyntas IV, who was the son of Perdiccas III, Philip managed to take the kingdom for himself that same year.

Philip’s military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success. He had however first to re-establish a situation which had been greatly worsened by the defeat against the Illyrians in which King Perdiccas himself had died. The Paionians and the Thracians had sacked and invaded the eastern regions of the country, while the Athenians had landed, at Methoni on the coast, a contingent under a Macedonian pretender called Argeus. Using diplomacy, Philip pushed back Paionians and Thracians promising tributes, and crushed the 3,000 Athenian hoplites (359). Momentarily free from his opponents, he concentrated on strengthening his internal position and, above all, his army. His most important innovation was doubtless the introduction of the phalanx infantry corps, armed with the famous sarissa, an exceedingly long spear, at the time the most important army corps in Macedonia.

Philip had married Audata, great-granddaughter of the Illyrian king of Dardania, Bardyllis. However, this did not prevent him from marching against them in 358 and crushing them in a ferocious battle in which some 7,000 Illyrians died (357). By this move, Philip established his authority inland as far as Lake Ohrid and the favour of the Epirotes.[6]

He also used the Social War as an opportunity for expansion. He agreed with the Athenians, who had been so far unable to conquer Amphipolis, which commanded the gold mines of Mount Pangaion, to lease it to them after its conquest, in exchange for Pydna (lost by Macedon in 363). However, after conquering Amphipolis, he kept both the cities (357). As Athens declared war against him, he allied with the Chalkidian League of Olynthus. He subsequently conquered Potidaea, this time keeping his word and ceding it to the League in 356. One year before Philip had married the Epirote princess Olympias, who was the daughter of the king of the Molossians.

In 356 BC, Philip also conquered the town of Crenides and changed its name to Philippi: he established a powerful garrison there to control its mines, which granted him much of the gold later used for his campaigns. In the meantime, his general Parmenion defeated the Illyrians again. Also in 356 Alexander was born, and Philip’s race horse won in the Olympic Games. In 355–354 he besieged Methone, the last city on the Thermaic Gulf controlled by Athens. During the siege, Philip lost an eye. Despite the arrival of two Athenians fleets, the city fell in 354. Philip also attacked Abdera and Maronea, on the Thracian seaboard (354–353).

250px Map Macedonia 336 BC en.svg Philip II of Macedon (Wikipedia)

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Map of the territory of Philip II of Macedon

Involved in the Third Sacred War which had broken out in Greece, in the summer of 353 he invaded Thessaly, defeating 7,000 Phocians under the brother of Onomarchus. The latter however defeated Philip in the two succeeding battles. Philip returned to Thessaly the next summer, this time with an army of 20,000 infantry and 3,000 cavalry including all Thessalian troops. In the Battle of Crocus Field 6,000 Phocians fell, while 3,000 were taken as prisoners and later drowned. This battle granted Philip an immense prestige, as well the free acquisition of Pherae. Philip was also tagus of Thessaly, and he claimed as his own Magnesia, with the important harbour of Pagasae. Philip did not attempt to advance into Central Greece because the Athenians, unable to arrive in time to defend Pagasae, had occupied Thermopylae.

Hostilities with Athens did not yet take place, but Athens was threatened by the Macedonian party which Philip’s gold created in Euboea. From 352 to 346 BC, Philip did not again come south. He was active in completing the subjugation of the Balkan hill-country to the west and north, and in reducing the Greek cities of the coast as far as the Hebrus. To the chief of these coastal cities, Olynthus, Philip continued to profess friendship until its neighboring cities were in his hands.

180px PhilipIIGoldStaterHeadOfApollo Philip II of Macedon (Wikipedia)

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Philip II gold stater, with head of Apollo.

 

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The Golden Larnax, at the Museum of Vergina, which contains the possible remains of King Philip II.

 

180px Philip II of Macedon CdM Philip II of Macedon (Wikipedia)

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Victory medal (niketerion) struck in Tarsus, 2nd c. BC (Cabinet des Médailles, Paris

 

In 349 BC, Philip started the siege of Olynthus:

Read more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page    – Philip II of Macedon

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