Dora, Gruevski, and Balkan destabilization

 

 Readers emails Dora, Gruevski, and Balkan destabilization
I find it very interesting that all the revelations about Dora are taking place after Samaras was elected as the next ND leader.  Someone has sensed that the elevation of Samaras within the ND and the participation of LAOS in the Parliament has signaled that the Greeks cannot and will not take the sell out of their country anymore.  In March of 2010, Greece could have elections due to the up-coming election of the President; the ND and LAOS could bring to the Parliament a center-right government that would snub Skopje.  Nevertheless, no matter what agreements Dora has made, PASOK may not use them as their excuse to give Macedonia and its derivatives to the Slavs because article 36.3 of the Greek Constitution states: “Secret articles of an agreement may in no case reverse the open ones.”  Thus, any agreement Dora might have made, the open provisions are the important ones.
 
Is it possible that these revelations, which are true, will be used by PASOK or anyone else as the excuse of giving in everything Skopje wants?  The South Balkans must not destabilize and in essence Skopje has only three months in order to compromise.  Gruevski greed demands more from Greece while he is not willing to give anything away; at the same time, his extreme nationalism disallow him to fully implement the Ohrid Agreement.  The Gruevski administration  creates as much destabilization as possible with its purpose to proclaim to the world, especially to the EU and USA that the only way that the “Republic of Macedonia” would stay intact it would be if the Greeks give them the name erga omnes.  Thus, the idea is to eliminate anything Macedonian from Greece.  Domestic destabilization was exactly the excuse Skopje used just before the referendum resulting to their recognition by the USA in November 2004.  Dora continuously fell for such argument because she did not know better.  The name dispute with Greece is not the reason for the dispute of the Slavs with their Albanian compatriots. The latter is the result of the Slavic extremism, but not one in the EU and USA are talking about it.  The history that Greece tries so hard to eliminate from the discussions is the crux of the Skopjan thinking that feeds their extremist appetite for more soil.
 
Some people might think that PASOK will use Dora as the scapegoat in this case, but I do not think they can.  Dora is guilty on the matter.  Her strong desire for power has created the situation.  She is the victim of her own egotism and strong sense of nepotism because of inherent grooming for power.  She thought that that by “solving” the 18-year long problem she would be THE hero to the majority of the Greeks, who in her opinion, adore her.  One does not become a hero, by giving away one’s own heritage.  Macedonia, as any part of Greek land, is a national treasure, and that is why Greeks from all over the world fought for its liberation.  Macedonia is not part of a lost game as Dora frantically last July told the representatives of the Pan-Macedonian Association in Crete.  If Greece has lost the game is because of her; she is the one who lost it for Greece.
   
Greeks must actively, but peacefully demonstrate in the streets that they care about Macedonia.  Being passive from the fear of being called by the left nationalists, patriots, etc. has contributed to the present mess.  One must have in mind the American old phrase, “Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me.”  Left activists need to learn the difference between nationalism and patriotism.  One cannot confuse nationalism with patriotism or even xenophobia.  Nationalism turns devotion to the nation into principles or programs.  It thus contains a different dimension from mere patriotism, which can be a devotion to one’s country or nation devoid of any project for political action.  Patriotism is defined as love of one’s country or zeal in the defense of the interests of one’s country.  It transcends political affinities and affiliations. Xenophobia is an unreasonable fear, distrust, or hatred of strangers, foreigners, or anything perceived as foreign or different.
 
If I were a foreign official, I would help the Skopjans as much as I can because they have actively shown that they care about their country; they are patriots!  Greeks by their silence have demonstrated complete apathy helping the Skopjans more than ever, which it masterfully uses the Greek left as its fifth phalanx in Greece.  Greek politicians are included because they were and are silent as well.  When Dora was doing whatever she was doing where were they to stop her?  When Ms. McDougall was roaming Western Macedonia, where were the authorities of the Prefectures of Florina, Kastoria, Pella or even Kozani to explain to her regarding the imaginary “Macedonian” minority in their jurisdiction? This link is from the Thessaloniki newspaper Μακεδονία  published on 6 December 2009.  http://www.makthes.gr/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=48102
 
As a final note, Greeks have to learn how to read the news.  It very important for one to sense what the Greek Press does not write about as it is what they write about.  Greeks have to learn how to think outsize the box and how to connect the dots in a puzzle inside or outside the box.  When they are able to do both, then they will elect people who deserve their trust. Until that time, their elected officials of Greece are για τα πανηγύργια.
 
I cannot believe any of those who cast their vote for Dora would like to see the Macedonian heritage given to the Slavs.  Greece is not a tribal state so she cannot invoke the excuse “I am a Cretan, I do not care about Macedonia” and her ignorance on anything Macedonian cannot be used as her excuse. Dora should resign from her position as Vouleftis or Representative in the Parliament, since she does not represent any Greek, but herself.

A Reader

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Want more of this? See these Posts:

  1. Greece’s stand on the name dispute by Dora Bakoyannis
  2. Tired of Dora and her Clan
  3. Balkan States in the Balkan Wars of 1912-1913
  4. “The Balkan Peninsula”, by E. de Laveleye, 1887
  5. Gruevski on Isolation – Slovenia turns its back on FYROM
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